Research about SentenceShaper

SentenceShaper has been studied in government-funded grants with our research partners and others.  These studies looked at two questions. First, is SentenceShaper a helpful communication aid? (For example, can people say things with the program that they could not otherwise express?) Second, is it an effective treatment tool? (For example, can people’s spontaneous speech get better […] Read more »

Research about SentenceShaper as a communication aid

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When we ask whether SentenceShaper is a useful communication aid, the most basic question is: “Can people say things with the program that they could not otherwise express?”  Even if the answer is “yes”,  of course, we will also want to find out whether this makes a difference in their lives. We will use the […] Read more »

Research about SentenceShaper as a treatment tool

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When we ask whether SentenceShaper is an effective treatment tool, we mean: “If people use the program for a period of time, will their spontaneous, unaided speech get better?” If so, we will call these improvements “treatment effects” (once we make sure that they were caused by use of the program and not spontaneous recovery, […] Read more »

Caveats and questions for further research

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While many people with mild to moderate nonfluent aphasia show aided effects (that is, they produce better speech when using SentenceShaper than they can produce without the prosthesis), these effects do not always carry over into treatment effects (that is, their spontaneous, unaided speech may or may not improve). And people who do show treatment […] Read more »

Articles about SentenceShaper

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Below is a list of journal articles about SentenceShaper. Please contact us with any inquiries or if you would like reprints. This list can also be found in our “Overview of SentenceShaper Research”, a short summary of research about the program that can be downloaded from the “Manuals and Guides” page of this website. Publications […] Read more »

SentenceShaper research grants

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SentenceShaper has been studied in collaboration with internationally recognized neuropsychologists at two sites: Moss Rehabilitation Research Institute in Philadelphia (Myrna Schwartz, PhD) and the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore (Rita Berndt, PhD; Denise McCall, MA-CCC-SLP). The program has also been studied independently at the University of British Columbia (Barbara Purves, PhD). Many […] Read more »